International Culture

‘A Gentle Breeze in the Village’: Film Review

By Nana Adwoa Antwi-Boasiako

Directed by Nobuhiro Yamashita and written by Fusako Kuramochi as part of the Japanese slice of life shojo manga series, A Gentle Breeze in the Village (Tennen Kokekko) deals with being content or exploring the unknown. Six students at a small village school that runs from kindergarten through middle school is accustomed to its routine. The town is so small that everyone knows each other. The main character Soyo Migita is the only student in her class and the oldest. Her days as the most senior student will soon be over when she leaves for high school. One day a new boy -Hiromi – arrives from the big city of Tokyo. He becomes the talk of town as everyone wants to be around him and joins Soyo class.

With nothing to do on the weekends the kids always hang out together and go to the beach and local carnival together. Soyo come to realize that the Hiromi has sparked a new emotion in her. As they embark on a teenage romance, with obstacles from their own parents past relationships and what made Hiromi’s mother leave the town.

This movie was shown at the The Japanese Cultural Center on 18th St. They showcase different aspects of Japanese culture aside from the embassy. Anime pictures decorate the walls of the center. It has a theater where they show Japanese movies twice weekly. An anime or feature film will be shown at different times. The center hosts lectures, festivals and everything Japanese culture. For current events at the cultural center click here.

Fish and tea are part daily Japanese cuisine. A set up table inside the Japanese cultural center. (Photo: Nana Adwoa Antwi-Boasiako)

Fish and tea are part daily Japanese cuisine. A set up table inside the Japanese cultural center.
(Photo: Nana Adwoa Antwi-Boasiako)

A display at the Japanese Cultural Center (Photo: Nana Adwoa Antwi-Boasiako)

A display at the Japanese Cultural Center
(Photo: Nana Adwoa Antwi-Boasiako)

A display of Japanese emperor and empress. (Photo: Nana Adwoa Antwi-Boasiako)

A display of Japanese emperor and empress.
(Photo: Nana Adwoa Antwi-Boasiako)

A traditional Japanese table setting inside the Japanese Cultural Center. (Photo: Nana Adwoa Antwi-Boasiako)

A traditional Japanese table setting inside the Japanese Cultural Center.
(Photo: Nana Adwoa Antwi-Boasiako)

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